Home | Editor Desk | Awaken the Inner Child of yourself

Awaken the Inner Child of yourself

By
Font size: Decrease font Enlarge font

 

Is being grown up proving to be a stumbling block to your success? Has your imagination and belief been stifled by maturity and adulthood? Brian Aldiss painted a bleak, but awakening picture of adulthood with the words: “When childhood dies, its corpses are called adults and they enter society, one of the politer names of hell. That is why we dread children, even if we love them; they show us the state of our decay." According to Dr. Moses, it's strange to think that being mature and grown up can be a liability rather than an asset. But it can. When you are a child the world is full of possibilities. There is so much you can do and so much you can be. It seems as though anything is possible. One of the hardest things to do in life is to rekindle the possibilities and hope of our childhood. For those who want to achieve greatness this is important because, as Mencius observed, “The great man is he who does not lose his child's-heart." Watch any child play and you will see how much they believe in themselves and what they are doing. When a child is playing “doctor" or “teacher" they are totally absorbed in that role. At that time there is very little you can do to convince them that they are not doctors or teachers. They behave like they are, they will dress like they are and, given a chance, will give you an injection with utter conviction that they know what they are doing.

 

Editor's Desk

How Much Faster Can You Learn?

Say you were to optimize everything you possibly could for a particular learning goal. You used the best time-management system, you picked exactly the right tasks that would drive learning improvement, you applied tremendous motivation and effort. How much faster could you learn something than the status quo would expect? The answer, of course, will be: it depends. But that's rather unsatisfying, if true, because the crucial question is: what does it depend on? Asking how much improvement over the status quo or expected rate of progress is an interesting question in many domains. In some areas, there might be ... Read More

  • Email to a friend Email to a friend
  • Print version Print version