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Success means Satisfaction and failures mean pain

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The problem with craving is that it is incomplete. It places the entire emphasis on only one moment, the goal. In your desire to be rich, this means that the entire emphasis is placed on the moment you reach a particular income. Everything before is merely a lead-up to this moment, and everything after is simply a consequence of it. As Scott H Young thinks that “Life is a journey, not a destination.” It's a nice platitude, but I don't think it captures the real impact of what I'm suggesting. Small snippets of wisdom like this feel nice, but rarely communicate anything important. “Be yourself,” is another piece of frequently-cited wisdom that has become essentially meaningless. A process focus means that successes and failures are equal. This has a nice ring to it, but it's a system few people follow. How often can you say that you feel just as good with a win as you do with a loss? Instead, most people operate from craving, where success means satisfaction and failures are pain.

A process focus treats any pursuit as you would a game. In a game, the act of playing is the real motivation, not the win. After a heated chess match, you are generally no better off now that you've won. The only reason to play was the process of playing. When you approach an area of life from a process focus, you see the entire path, not the goal as the reason to start. Run a business because you love running a business.

 

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